Roasted Vegetables (30 recipes)

Source: Roasted Vegetables | Food & Wine

Chicken-Fat-Roasted Vegetables with Gremolata

For extra flavor, bloggers Melissa and Jasmine Hemsley toss their vegetables in chicken or duck fat before roasting, then top them with a bright, lemony mix of parsley and minced garlic.

Roasted Peppers with Garlicky Breadcrumbs

Mimi Thorisson tops sweet roasted peppers with her deliciously garlicky and salty homemade breadcrumbs.

Roasted Lemon Broccoli with Tahini-Yogurt Sauce

Cookbook author Tara Duggan is a master of root-to-stalk vegetable cooking. She uses both the broccoli stalk and the florets for this spicy, tangy recipe.

Roasted Carrots with Caraway and Coriander

This lovely dish combines a trio of ingredients from the same family: sweet roasted carrots, coriander and caraway.

Honey-Glazed Roasted Root Vegetables

The secret to this sweet, slightly tangy dish: the touch of sherry vinegar in the glaze.

Roasted Broccoli with Lemon and Pine Nuts – go to recipe

In a clever twist on clafoutis (a dessert of fruit baked in a sweet custardy batter), Grace Parisi makes this savory version by baking colorful roasted vegetables in a light one flavored with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. If any of the less-common ingredients, such as orange cauliflower and purple sweet potatoes, aren’t available, feel free to substitute whichever similar vegetables are.

Roasting vegetables at a high temperature caramelizes them, making them intensely flavorful. You may think of roasting as a long process, but we cut each of the vegetables into small cubes or thin slices so they need only thirty minutes in the oven.

Why are these ridiculously easy brussels sprouts so good? First they’re coarsely shredded, which gives them an appealing texture. Then the sprouts are roasted in a hot oven until they’re lightly charred, which enhances their nutty sweetness. They’re finished with a sprinkling of Parmesan cheese, which melts into the leaves.

This Indian twist on the traditional roasted butternut squash is supereasy: After tossing the squash and chickpeas with curry and cayenne, Melissa Rubel Jacobson roasts them, then drizzles the dish with a cooling cilantro-spiked yogurt sauce.

Winter vegetables like carrots, beets, parsnips and celery root are still plentiful in March and are terrific when roasted until sweet and blistered. Sophie Dahl loves the vegetables’ vibrant colors on dreary days.

For winter squash that is crispy on the outside and moist within, Melissa Perello halves each one, roasts it until soft, then cuts it into wedges and roasts it some more.

Fiber-rich white beans are delicious with a lid of bubbly cheese.

When roasting winter vegetables, Melissa Rubel Jacobson says be sure to chop them about the same size, so they cook at the same rate. And toss them at least once while they’re in the oven, so they brown evenly.

Sometimes rethinking just means not overthinking. Don’t forget to enjoy seasonal ingredients just as they are.

It takes about only three minutes to make this thick, creamy semolina on the stove; the mushrooms cook in the oven, unattended, for 25 minutes. “This is the ultimate lazy man’s side dish,” says Jason Travi.

“This recipe is a very traditional one, and this is a common ingredient combination,” says chef Ferit Sarper. He makes the dish especially appealing by serving the eggplant whole and then topping it with an incredibly light tomato vinaigrette.

Goat butter (sold at specialty-food stores; use regular butter if unavailable) is white, smooth and creamy. Chef Tyler Brown likes using it in this riff on the classic pairing of roasted beets and goat cheese.

Roasting cauliflower caramelizes the florets, making them super sweet. Tossed with crunchy pine nuts and salty olives and capers, this dish is perfect with roasted chicken or steamed fish.

Chef Tom Fundaro looks forward to fall just so he can eat Fuyu persimmons as sweet as sugar. Fundaro features them in this satisfying and nicely bitter fall salad.

Artichokes are notorious for making wine taste bitter. To prevent that, Michael Chiarello slow-roasts artichoke hearts in extra-virgin olive oil to bring out their sweetness, then serves them with prosciutto, an ingredient that matches particularly well with wine.

Thick, meaty slices of king oyster mushrooms are roasted in the oven for a rich, concentrated flavor.

Bagna cauda, the Italian anchovy dip, inspired the dressing here.

Roasted Vegetables with Aioli

Drizzle vegetables with olive oil, roast them in the oven until tender, and serve—what could be simpler? With a garlicky, lemon-tinged mayonnaise sauce, you have a feast.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s