Come to our Stress Management Workshop

9 participants already registered, a few more spots are still left!

Stress Management

Saturday, Jun 4, 2016, 6:00 PM

McGill Faculty of Medicine – McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
3655 Promenade Sir William Osler (Drummond), H3G 1Y6, Room 208/209 Montreal, QC

1 healthy lifestylers Attending

Everyone experiences stress on a daily basis, but there is a simple way to take control and not let it overwhelm us! Come learn how to apply psychotherapy tricks to manage your stress, big or small, to help you excel at work and in relationships.This is a guided session with an experienced psychotherapist and a period of Q&A at the end that will a…

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What does our inner voice sound like?

Source: What does our inner voice sound like? – Compass Orientation Services

Self-talk and the intensity with which it impacts emotions will vary greatly.

Self-talk is so subtle that it is pretty much automatic and thus, its impact on emotions and behaviour, is largely unconscious.

Anxiety bubbleAnxious self-talk is based on the premise that there is potential threat, and this perpetuates avoidance, which only further reinforces anxious self-talk. Thus, avoidance is anxiety’s best friend. Examples of anxious self-talk: Oh no…I made another mistake, what will my boss think? what is I get fired, what am  I gonna do if I lose my job!? Here we see how making a mistake has been interpreted as a potential threat.

There are a variety of techniques to help reduce and better manage anxious self-talk. Continue reading

Come to our “Workshop: Understand & Overcome Your Anxiety” – May 27, 6:30pm

Workshop: Understand & Overcome Your Anxiety

Friday, May 27, 2016, 6:30 PM

McGill Faculty of Medicine – McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
3655 Promenade Sir William Osler (Drummond), H3G 1Y6, Room 208/209 Montreal, QC

1 healthy lifestylers Attending

This unique workshop will teach us how to manage everyday anxieties to increase our well-being and help us uncover blind spots that are holding us all back in the important aspects of our life! Come take advantage of this opportunity at a significantly reduced cost, and learn to use the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) approach that therapists us…

Check out this Meetup →

 

This unique workshop will teach us how to manage everyday anxieties to increase our well-being and help us uncover blind spots that are holding us all back in the important aspects of our life! Come take advantage of this opportunity at a significantly reduced cost, and learn to use the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) approach that therapists use to reduce and control anxiety.

Ivan Rubio, a psychotherapist, counselor at PAE and Optima Santé Globale Inc. and founder of Compass Orientation Services, will guide this workshop.

Number of participants: 10-25.

Healthy refreshments will be served.

A private psychotherapy session (worth 100$) will be drawn among attendants!

“Expanding our comfort zone & enjoying life. Learning various behavioral and cognitive techniques proven to help reduce anxiety.”

See you there 🙂

REGISTER HERE: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/workshop-understand-overcome-your-anxiety-tickets-24934345298

Venez voir notre “Atelier: Comprendre et Vaincre Votre Anxiété” – 20 Mai, 18h30

Atelier: Comprendre et Vaincre Votre Anxiété

Friday, May 20, 2016, 6:30 PM

McGill Faculté de Médecine – McIntyre Sciences Médicales
3655 Promenade Sir William Osler (Drummond), H3G 1Y6, Salle 208/209 Montréal, QC

1 healthy lifestylers Attending

Cet atelier unique nous enseignera la façon de gérer nos angoisses quotidiennes pour augmenter notre bien-être et nous aidera à découvrir nos points faibles qui nous empêchent de réussir dans les aspects importants de notre vie! Venez profiter de cette occasion à un coût considérablement réduit, et apprennez à utiliser la thérapie comportementale e…

Check out this Meetup →

 

Cet atelier unique nous enseignera la façon de gérer nos angoisses quotidiennes pour augmenter notre bien-être et nous aidera à découvrir nos points faibles qui nous empêchent de réussir dans les aspects importants de notre vie! Venez profiter de cette occasion à un coût considérablement réduit, et apprennez à utiliser la thérapie comportementale et cognitive (TCC) que les thérapeutes appliquent pour réduire et contrôler l’anxiété.

Ivan Rubio, psychothérapeute, conseiller au PAE et Optima Santé Globale Inc. et fondateur de Service d’Orientation Boussole, guidera cet atelier.

Nombre de participants: 10-25

Une collation santé sera servie.

Une séance de psychothérapie privée (d’une valeur de 100 $) sera tiré au sort parmi les participants!

«L’expansion de notre zone de confort et profiter de la vie. L’apprentissage de diverses techniques comportementales et cognitives éprouvées pour aider à réduire l’anxiété. ”

INSCRIVEZ-VOUS ICI: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/atelier-comprendre-et-vaincre-votre-anxiete-tickets-24934686318

Uncertainty is more stressful than pain, say neurologists

Source: Uncertainty is more stressful than pain, say neurologists – Medical News Today

“Sorrow is better than fear. Fear is a journey, a terrible journey, but sorrow is, at least, an arriving.” So says Father Vincent in “Cry, the Beloved Country,” Alan Paton’s celebrated novel about South Africa.
[uncertainty]
Which way to go? Not knowing the outcome can be tougher than the outcome itself.

Now, research published in Nature Communications suggests that knowing that something bad is going to happen is better than not knowing whether it will happen or not.

Findings show that a small possibility of receiving a painful electric shock causes people more stress than knowing for sure that a shock was on the way. Continue reading

6 Ways to Become More Likely to Succeed

Source: 6 Ways to Become More Likely to Succeed | Psychology Today

Imagine this scenario: You’re about to give a big presentation. There’s an eager audience waiting to hear what you have to say. You believe in your idea and you know that this opportunity could lead to bigger and better things for you. If you were facing this scenario, what mindset would you likely be in? What thoughts would be running through your head? Would you be focused on a plan for success, or on hopes of avoiding failure?

There’s a big difference.

If you were focused on success, you might think about how you’ll deliver your presentation in a way that will resonate best with the audience. If, however, you were focused on avoiding failure, you might only be thinking about how to survive your presentation without embarrassing yourself. Continue reading

Can Stress Cause Weight Gain?

Source: Can Stress Cause Weight Gain?

You’re having problems at work or at home. You’re stressed, and it’s beginning to show — in more ways than one. You’ve noticed a bulge around your mid-section that wasn’t there before. Where are these extra pounds coming from?
Stress could be one of the culprits. It plays a role in weight gain. While it can make you have less of an appetite at first, long-term “chronic” stress actually boosts your hunger. Continue reading

A math test a day keeps the weight away, by activating brown fat

Source: A math test a day keeps the weight away, by activating brown fat – Medical News Today

The mild stress caused by anticipation of a math test can raise cortisol levels and stimulate brown fat to produce heat. The findings, which could have implications for treating obesity, are published in Experimental Physiology.
[overweight man looking worried]Can mild stress help burn calories?

Scientists previously thought that only babies and hibernating mammals had brown adipose tissue (BAT), or brown fat. But in 2009, small amounts were found in adults. We now know that most adults have 50-100 g, mainly stored in the neck, or supraclavicular region.

While white fat stores excess calories, brown fat burns energy and produces heat – over 300 times more heat than other body tissues. This suggests that it plays a role in human metabolism.

People with a lower body mass index (BMI) tend to have more brown fat, but whether or not this is a direct consequence remains uncertain.

This unique ability to rapidly generate heat and metabolize glucose has piqued the interest of scientists looking for ways to fight obesity. Continue reading

Deep Breathing: Step-by-Step Stress Relief

Source: Deep Breathing: Step-by-Step Stress Relief

When you or your kids are stressed and need to relax, don’t point them to the TV or the pantry. Chips or channels don’t provide relief. Instead, take a deep breath.

Deep breathing is an easy way to relax and let your worries go. You can do it pretty much anywhere, and it only takes a few minutes.

Also called belly breathing, diaphragmatic breathing, and abdominal breathing, it helps ease stress. It can also lower your blood pressure and relax tense muscles. When you learn healthy ways to relax, it can be easier to avoid unhealthy choices. Stress makes it harder to make healthy choices like picking good foods or finding the energy to exercise. When you’re relaxed, you can be more mindful. Continue reading

Easily stressed teens have increased hypertension risk later in life

Source: Easily stressed teens have increased hypertension risk later in life – Medical News Today

High blood pressure is a large and growing problem in the US. A new study that followed 1.5 million teens through to adulthood investigates the role of early psychological parameters on the likelihood of developing hypertension.
[Stressed teenage boy]
A new study links a teen’s ability to cope with stress and hypertension later in life.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is both common and dangerous.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 1 in 3 American adults have high blood pressure, equating to around 70 million people.

Consistently high blood pressure raises the risk of heart disease and stroke, two of the leading causes of death in America. Continue reading

Depression may pass from mothers to daughters

Source: Depression may pass from mothers to daughters – Medical News Today

Depression appears to be passed down from mothers to daughters, say researchers who have been looking at similarities in brain structures between generations. The research is published in the Journal of Neuroscience.
[depressed woman and baby]
Similarities in brain structure suggest daughters may inherit depression from their mothers.

Around 8% of Americans aged 12 years and over are affected by depression. It is commonly found in both mothers and daughters, previous human studies have reported. Continue reading

The Destructive Power of Borderline Personality Disorder

Source: The Destructive Power of Borderline Personality Disorder | Psychology Today

Self-harm and suicidal thoughts are a troubling part of many mental illnesses, but for those struggling with borderline personality disorder (BPD), the risk is extreme.

shutterstock_233362051In fact, self-harm and suicide attempts are so prevalent in BPD that it is the only mental disorder that includes such behaviors as part of its diagnostic criteria. Almost 80% of those with BPD report a history of suicide attempts, and suicide deaths range between 8-10%. This rate is 50 times greater than that found in the general population, according to a 2014 analysis of BPD research by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Then there is self-destructive behavior—cutting, burning, hitting, hair-pulling, head-banging, and skin-picking. More than three-quarters of those with BPD engage in at least one of these actions, with a 2008 study putting the number closer to 90%. The reasons vary and can overlap but most commonly include:

  • An attempt to shift the pain from the mental to the physical;
  • To feel something or “more real”;
  • To express anger or frustration or, conversely, to keep emotions in check;
  • As self-punishment;
  • As a plea for attention or help.

Such self-harm classifies as nonsuicidal self-injury and doesn’t usually involve an intent to die. Instead, it becomes an attempt to use pain to deal with pain. Continue reading

4 Lifestyle Changes That Will Boost Your Mental Health

Source: 4 Lifestyle Changes That Will Boost Your Mental Health | Psychology Today

When we seek help for a mental health condition, we can expect to hear about various medications and treatment options, but what’s often missing from the conversation is any talk of lifestyle changes. In a recent University of Illinois study (link is external), about half of those with symptoms of mental illness reported that they receive no wellness advice from their health care provider.

That’s a lamentable oversight because lifestyle changes—things as simple as nutrition and exercise (link is external)—can have a significant impact on quality of life, for any of us, but especially for those dealing with issues such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. They can also help minimize the development of risk factors that can lead to conditions like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension, all of which are seen at higher rates in those with mental illness, the study noted. Continue reading

Skin-to-skin contact after birth reduces stress levels for mothers

Source: Skin-to-skin contact after birth reduces stress levels for mothers – Medical News Today

The benefits of skin-to-skin contact for babies after birth have been well documented. But what about for mothers? After all, they, too, have been on quite a journey. New research to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition suggests maternal stress levels benefit from skin-to-skin cuddling.
Newborn baby
Skin-to-skin contact after birth not only benefits newborns, but also mothers, new research shows.

Birth can be a tiring time for both mother and baby, but previous studies have outlined the many benefits of mothers (or fathers) sharing skin-to-skin contact with a newborn.

For example, babies who have an hour of post-birth skin contact are less stressed, which means their breathing and heart rate is more stable, they cry less and they digest their food better when they start to feed. Continue reading

How stress affects your body – Video

Our hard-wired stress response is designed to gives us the quick burst of heightened alertness and energy needed to perform our best. But stress isn’t all good. When activated too long or too often, stress can damage virtually every part of our body. Sharon Horesh Bergquist gives us a look at what goes on inside our body when we are chronically stressed.

Source: How stress affects your body – Sharon Horesh Bergquist | TED-Ed

Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction

Source: Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction

Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn developed the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Since its inception, MBSR has evolved into a common form of complementary medicine addressing a variety of health problems. The National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine has provided a number of grants to research the efficacy of the MBSR program in promoting healing (see “Studies” below for information on this research). Completed studies have found that pain-related drug utilization was decreased, and activity levels and feelings of self esteem increased, for a majority of participants. More information on these studies can be found on the University of Massachusetts Medical School website: Center for Mindfulness Continue reading

Stressed dads affect offspring brain development through sperm microRNA

Source: Stressed dads affect offspring brain development through sperm microRNA — ScienceDaily

More and more, scientists have realized that DNA is not the only way that a parent can pass on traits to their offspring. Events experienced by a parent over a lifetime can also have an impact.

Now University of Pennsylvania researchers have shown at the molecular level how experiencing stress changes a male mouse’s sperm in such a way that it affects his offspring’s response to stress. This change is imparted epigenetically, or through a means other than the DNA code, by molecules called microRNAs, or miRs.

The work, led by Tracy L. Bale, professor of neuroscience in Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine and Perelman School of Medicine, provides important clues for understanding how a father’s life experiences may affect his children’s brain development and mental health through a purely biological and not behavioral means. Continue reading

Why Do I Waste So Much Time? ADHD, Sleep, Stress, OCD, and More

Source: Why Do I Waste So Much Time? ADHD, Sleep, Stress, OCD, and More

Does it take you forever to make a doctor’s appointment, clean out your garage, or do your taxes? Putting off something that needs to be done is called procrastination. We all do it sometimes.

But if you constantly struggle to finish tasks, there may be a bigger problem at play.

Once you figure out your reasons, you can work on making the most of your time. Continue reading

The Therapeutic Science Of Adult Coloring Books: How This Childhood Pastime Helps Adults Relieve Stress

Source: The Therapeutic Science Of Adult Coloring Books: How This Childhood Pastime Helps Adults Relieve Stress

Coloring used to be reserved for children and the occasional adult who got to babysit them, but recently, the activity has found a different demographic. What started as a niche hobby has now turned into an international trend, as adult coloring books find themselves on more and more bestsellers’ lists throughout the world. However, while this trend may be a fun way to pass the time, it’s the books’ therapeutic properties that really have them flying off shelves.

The Healing Power Of Art

Art may not be able to cure disease, but it can surely make coping with it a lot better. Researchers have acknowledged the therapeutic qualities of art for years, and today, art therapy is used to help people express themselves when what they’re feeling is too difficult to put into words, such as when they’re faced with a cancer diagnosis.

Research shows this form of therapy often has tangible results. One 2006 study, for example, found that mindfulness art therapy for women with cancer helped to significantly decrease symptoms of physical and emotional distress during treatment. Another study from the same year concluded that after only one hour of art therapy, adult cancer patients of all ages “overwhelmingly expressed comfort” and a desire to continue with the therapy. Continue reading

Work stress linked to greater risk of stroke

Source: Work stress linked to greater risk of stroke – Medical News Today

Waitresses and nursing aides run a higher risk of stroke than janitors or teachers, according to research published in the journal Neurology.
[A woman stressed at work]
People who experience high levels of stress at work may be at greater risk for stroke.

Previous research over the last 2 decades has shown that high-strain jobs increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, regardless of social class. However, until now, the effect of work pressure on stroke has been unclear. Continue reading

The Ultimate List of Phobias and Fears

(source: FearOf)

Not sure if you have an anxiety disorder? Take the anxiety test.

These are the top 100 phobias in the world, with the most common ones listed from the top. You can click on each phobia to learn about causes, symptoms and treatments.

  1. Arachnophobia – The fear of spiders affects women four times more (48% women and 12% men).
  2. Ophidiophobia – The fear of snakes. Phobics avoid certain cities because they have more snakes.
  3. Acrophobia – The fear of heights. Five percent of the general population suffer from this phobia. Continue reading

Stressed? Take care of yourself!

article-2059839-0C6EFE84000005DC-978_468x286We’re all stressed, running from left to right all day, trying to get everything done, and that’s why we need some time for ourselves. I don’t need to tell you how bad stress is for your health – the media has already done a great job on scaring us about that! It raises your blood pressure, increases your chances of cardiac problems, lowers Continue reading

Coloring for Adults: The Anti-Stress… Does it Work?

There is a new relaxing activity among adults that is gaining popularity: Coloring! Maybe you h61ORmgfs0oL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ave tried it, or maybe you haven’t. I started coloring recently. Being a fairly restless and stressed person, I though that I may benefit from an anti-stress activity like this one. A few of my friends suggested it so I found  the book on the left among the well-reviewed coloring books for adults on Amazon. I have to say that at first it was very challenging to color because I wanted to move, to think, to cook, or do anything else but remain almost still and quiet. But after a few pages, I noticed that I am definitely more relaxed and that my mind doesn’t wander into the stressful thoughts that I would otherwise have. Continue reading